Homer to Seldovia, Alaska: A whale of a trip across Kachemak Bay

Kachemak Bay, Alaska
Gull Island, with the Kenai Mountains as a backdrop

In a recent post, we talked about our trip to Seldovia, a remote town that can only be reached by air or water.  There are several options for getting there, and we chose the Seldovia Wildlife Tour, a sightseeing excursion with Rainbow Tours.

This boat tour, which was seven hours round-trip from Homer to Seldovia and back, took us across Kachemak Bay, an incredibly rich habitat that supports many wildlife species, from sea birds to sea otters, seals, and porpoise as well as whales.  And the view—of the glacier-carved Kenai Mountains—is spectacular.

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Seldovia, Alaska: Artists with chainsaws and a carving competition

While in Seldovia, we watched as five master carvers used chainsaws to transform blocks of wood into amazing pieces of art.  The Seldovia Craft Invitational Chainsaw Carving Competition, held annually on Labor Day weekend, was happening while we were there, and it was a treat to witness these unique artists in action. Continue reading “Seldovia, Alaska: Artists with chainsaws and a carving competition”

A weekend in charming Seldovia, Alaska

Seldovia, Alaska
Chainsaw carving (Artist: Derrick Stanton)

Seldovia isn’t on an island, but it might as well be—it’s practically surrounded by water, it can only be reached by plane or boat, and its single main street is lined with small businesses owned by locals, with nary a fast food joint to be found.  The minute we stepped off the boat, I felt myself relaxing into the place.  We were in the hands of the locals, and the stresses of daily life were behind us.  There was no place to be and nothing urgent to attend to.  The only thing missing was my flip flops (it was too chilly); otherwise, the trip was perfect.

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Seward, Alaska: Alaska SeaLife Center

Harbor seal, Alaska SeaLife Center
Harbor seal, Alaska SeaLife Center

From the parking lot outside of the Alaska SeaLife Center, one can hear a variety of sounds; the sea birds screech and call, and the sea lions, if they’re outside, bark raucously.  Eagles, which often perch on posts outside the center, may add their plaintive call to the din.

All manner of sea creatures have found a home in Seward’s SeaLife Center, and the cacophony outside the complex gives visitors a preview of what’s to come.  We became members shortly after moving to Seward and have enjoyed frequent visits ever since, looking in on the residents and learning more about the amazing place in which we live.  The SeaLife Center does important work, not only educating the public through the state’s only public aquarium but also undertaking marine research and wildlife rescue and rehabilitation.

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Katmai National Park: Bear 410, queen of the bear jam

Brooks Camp, Bear 410
Sleeping beauty

No blog series about the bears of Katmai would be complete without a profile of 410.

Any bear at Brooks Camp has the capacity to cause a human traffic jam (see our recent post), but Bear 410 (nicknamed “Four Ton” because she’s one of the largest females in the park) goes above and beyond.  So renowned is her ability to shut things down that she’s been called “queen of the bear jams.” Continue reading “Katmai National Park: Bear 410, queen of the bear jam”

Katmai National Park: Brooks Camp bear jams

What they are, and how to survive ’em

Brooks Camp, bears at the Point
Bears at the Point, (probably) unaware of the disruption they’re causing
“Point, you’re going to want to retreat; Point, you need to retreat.”

During the day, park rangers stood sentry at various places throughout Brooks Camp, monitoring bear activity and sharing details with one another via radio.  We were on the Lower River Platform, and the ranger had his binoculars trained on a spot across the Brooks River known as the Point.  He was letting his counterpart know that a bear was headed their way.

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Seward, Alaska: The Great Alaskan Earthquake of 1964

In January, Dale and I experienced our first real earthquake, so now is as good a time as any to talk about a much more famous quake and one of the most significant events in Alaskan history—the Great Earthquake of 1964.

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Seward, Alaska: Our first earthquake

tsunami_hazard_sign_blue
Source: USGS

 

The shower doors clattered obnoxiously, waking us up.  Wondering what our neighbors—normally so quiet—could be doing to at this ungodly hour, Dale climbed out of bed and wandered into the living room.  Even in the dark, he could tell that the blinds and other objects were also shaking.   This was no noisy neighbor; we were having an earthquake.

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Katmai National Park’s Zen Momma: 409 Beadnose and her cubs

We stood on the Lower River Platform one afternoon and watched a family of bears for some time.  The mama, a beautiful sow with blonde ears and a distinctive, upturned nose, occasionally lifted her head to check her surroundings and then returned to napping.  One of her cubs lay beside her.

The other cub, however, had no intention of taking an afternoon nap.

Katmai National Park--Beadnose and cubs
Mom. Mom. Look at me. Mo-om.

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