Anchorage, Alaska: A young moose sighting in Kincaid Park

We spent the past few days in Anchorage, and on Monday we went for a walk in Kincaid, one of the city’s fantastic municipal parks.  It was rainy and cool and we enjoyed having the trail all to ourselves, but because moose and bear are commonly seen here, we were also vigilant.  
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The Iditarod: Alaska’s “Last Great Race”

The Iditarod wrapped up yesterday, with the last few mushers trickling into Nome.  Iditarod 2017 may go down as one of the greatest races of all time.  It was fast, with the top four mushers coming in under what was the standing speed record.  And the champion, Mitch Seavey, shattered that record (set by his son Dallas only a year ago) while also becoming the oldest person ever to win the Iditarod.

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10 things we can do to help endangered sea lions (and the rest of the creatures that live in the sea)

Alaska’s Steller sea lions

Warning: This post contains sad and disturbing photos of injured and deceased sea animals.

In January I wrote a post about the adorable Steller sea lions of Resurrection Bay.  Unfortunately, they’re endangered.

It was only when I started learning about sea lions for the blog that I discovered this fact, and after some debate I decided that I should share the sad side of my sea lion research with you.  So here goes:

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Seward snapshot: Not ALL of the eagles are starving

Yesterday, I talked at length about the sad fact that Seward’s eagles are sick, so I thought I’d follow up with evidence that not all of them are starving.  Dale took a photo of an adult eagle last weekend that was posing majestically next to the bay, but he didn’t notice until he processed the photo that this bird had just finished a meal.

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Seward, Alaska: Our starving eagles

“Three more!” I cried, pointing to the birds perched in the tree.

Driving through a neighborhood near the waterfront, we were witnessing something unexpected—a large convocation of eagles.  They were sitting atop telephone poles, perched on satellite dishes and rooftops, and even—as we saw when we turned the corner—blocking traffic in the street.

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